Amanda Reads Poetry

Amanda reads various things. And some other stuff.

Apr 23, 2014

"The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book."

Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

See, THIS is the problem I have with ‘literature’.

(via sophiaphilemon)

(via sophiaphilemon)

Apr 23, 2014

ticktockdearie:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.So.Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humansCelsius: what temperatures affect waterKelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

I like how this very helpful explanation contained the phrase “stop doing that spinning thing”

Now, we just need to convince the rest of the world to have their meteorologists use Fahrenheit as it’s much more logical for the weather reports. http://dodgysshit.com

ticktockdearie:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.

Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.

Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.

Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.

So.
Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humans
Celsius: what temperatures affect water
Kelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

I like how this very helpful explanation contained the phrase “stop doing that spinning thing”

Now, we just need to convince the rest of the world to have their meteorologists use Fahrenheit as it’s much more logical for the weather reports.

(via sophiaphilemon)

Apr 23, 2014

kayla-bird:

 

SLEEP TIME IS NOW
SWEET DREAMS HUMAN
I WILL BE HERE, SHARING MY WARMTHS 
I GOOD DOG
I KEEP MY HUMAN SAFE <3

http://gifak-net.tumblr.com/

kayla-bird:

 

SLEEP TIME IS NOW

SWEET DREAMS HUMAN

I WILL BE HERE, SHARING MY WARMTHS 

I GOOD DOG

I KEEP MY HUMAN SAFE <3

(via sophiaphilemon)

Apr 22, 2014

Apr 22, 2014

terriblerealestateagentphotos:

The owners assure us the pool will be dredged before anyone else can move in.
Follow on Twitter @BadRealtyPhotos.

I think Davy Jones will buy the property in its current condition.

terriblerealestateagentphotos:

The owners assure us the pool will be dredged before anyone else can move in.

Follow on Twitter @BadRealtyPhotos.

I think Davy Jones will buy the property in its current condition.

(via wordbirds)

Apr 21, 2014

nypl:

A happy 50th Anniversary to the 1964 World’s Fair! Check out the Library’s collection of photographs from the celebrated event. (and the awesome fashions, Mad Men fans eat your heart out!

Apr 21, 2014

cmog:

#ObjectoftheWeek Using a paperweight-related technique, Peiser overlaid this blown vessel with several layers of colorless #glass. Enclosed are drawings of #landscapes that were painstakingly made with pieces of colored glass and glass canes while the vessel was on the blowpipe. Only a few of these rare vessels were produced by Peiser, and their technical expertise for the time in which they were made is extraordinary. Ormand Oak PWV214, Mark Peiser, Penland, NC, 1979. (2007.4.195, Gift of the Ben W. Heineman Sr. Family)
#MeettheArtist Mark Peiser at tonight’s #BehindTheGlass the lecture, 6-7pm at the Museum. Free and open to the public. http://ift.tt/1hljHfr

cmog:

#ObjectoftheWeek
Using a paperweight-related technique, Peiser overlaid this blown vessel with several layers of colorless #glass. Enclosed are drawings of #landscapes that were painstakingly made with pieces of colored glass and glass canes while the vessel was on the blowpipe. Only a few of these rare vessels were produced by Peiser, and their technical expertise for the time in which they were made is extraordinary.
Ormand Oak PWV214, Mark Peiser, Penland, NC, 1979. (2007.4.195, Gift of the Ben W. Heineman Sr. Family)

#MeettheArtist Mark Peiser at tonight’s #BehindTheGlass the lecture, 6-7pm at the Museum. Free and open to the public. http://ift.tt/1hljHfr

Apr 21, 2014

drawingarchitecture:

Marcin Bialas 

drawingarchitecture:

Marcin Bialas 

Apr 20, 2014

lapetitecole:

Midnight On a New York Subway, Bound for Harlem, 1956
Henri Cartier-Bresson

What the hell? The subways used to have padded seats?

lapetitecole:

Midnight On a New York Subway, Bound for Harlem, 1956

Henri Cartier-Bresson

What the hell? The subways used to have padded seats?

(Source: mpdrolet, via oldnewyork)

Apr 20, 2014

lohrien:

Illustrations by Yoshitaka Amano

(via sophiaphilemon)